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Monday, June 11, 2007


Early morning in front of the columned porch.


A nice early morning shot of the area in front of the columned porch where Adam has been working.  He and his team have spent the past week and a half uncovering mudbrick architecture beneath the later (and much larger) masonry of the Mut Temple.  To the right you can see the curving wall, a close-up of which was posted yesterday.



Scraping salt accumulation from block.

 

The block we found last week with the red outline sketched on it has become coated with salt.  This often happens when an artifact has been buried and salty groundwater leaches into the porous stone.  When the artifact is removed from the ground and left to dry, the water evaporates leaving a coating of salt on the surface.  One of our conservators is carefully scraping the salt from the block’s surface and blowing it off with a squeeze bulb.

 



Will and Keli, our artists, contemplate the day’s work in the (relative) cool of the morning.

Will and Keli comtemplate the day's work.



Will demonstrates the method for copying inscriptions.

With Keli looking on, Will demonstrates the method for copying the inscriptions found on the pillars from the ‘Hall of Drunkenness’.


 

Lotfi, our conservator, oversees one of the decorated blocks on its journey around the Mut Temple to its new home in our rapidly filling open-air museum.

Lofti oversees moving a block to the open air museum.
Lofti oversees moving a block to the open air museum.




Lotfi, our conservator, oversees one of the decorated blocks on its journey around the Mut Temple to its new home in our rapidly filling open-air museum.

After having weathered three and a half millennia, we don’t want our blocks’ short trip around the temple and onto a mastaba (bench) to be their last.  To make sure they survive for several more millennia, Lotfi personally guides a block the last few inches onto the mastaba.

Lotfi, our conservator, oversees one of the decorated blocks on its journey around the Mut Temple to its new home in our rapidly filling open-air museum.

Lotfi, our conservator, oversees one of the decorated blocks on its journey around the Mut Temple to its new home in our rapidly filling open-air museum.



One of the most enduring tasks on an archaeological excavation is cleaning rocks.  There are always more rocks to clean.

Cleaning rocks.



Moving dirt.

 

And dirt to move.  There’s always more dirt to move, too.



Striking a commanding pose, Sarah prepares to take levels.

Sarah prepares to take levels.



Adam holding the stadia.

At such an early hour, it takes most of Adam’s brainpower to keep the stadia rod straight.  The rest of his brainpower is probably devoted to the contemplation of sleep.  Or beer.  Or possibly both.



A picture of Lotfi taking a picture of someone cleaning an ancient picture.

Taking pictures.


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