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Engineering Overview


  Engineering is a diverse and vast field that readily and eagerly accepts new graduates into employment. In every field of employment, from environmental careers to urban planning, there is a need for engineering in some form; engineers create eco-friendly cleaners and designs for bridges along with other products created by the fusion of mathematical and scientific principles.

  Within the field of engineering an engineer can design, test, or manufacture a product. Typically engineers specialize in either certain technology or a specific field subcategory. There are 17 engineering specialties recognized by the Federal Government’s Standard Occupational Classification system and many other new fields exist.1

  Engineering ultimately helps the public regardless of the subcategory. Engineers pool knowledge of science and mathematics to create products that will better the common good.

  For example, a Mechanical Engineer may design a smaller or more efficient refrigerator, and a Chemical Engineer manipulates chemicals to create anything from fabric to biodegradable plastics. Most engineers work in offices, laboratories, or industrial plants, but some engineering subcategories involve fieldwork.

  Recently, the issue of outsourcing has become a threat for engineers who wish to remain in the states after school because a higher rate of industries are moving their manufacturing plants to offshore locations. In 2003, 8% of engineering majors were unemployed; however, the need for engineers in information technology has persevered and in recent years even more jobs have opened for engineers working with computers or telecommunications.2



Engineering Specialties


  Biomedical Engineers combine the principles of engineering and medicine to advance technologies used in the medical world. Within this field an engineer may be involved in research, design, development, or testing of a new product. Biomedical engineers design and create both implantable products such as a heart valve or a prosthetic limb, and also the devices used in a hospital for medical purposes such as MRI devices. Many subcategories exist within this field such as biomaterials, medical imaging, biomechanics, and orthopedic engineering.

  Chemical Engineers use the properties of chemicals to manipulate chemical compounds and ultimately create new methods of chemical production. They rely on their knowledge and skill of extraction, isolation, combination, and general use of chemicals to succeed in this field. For example, a chemical engineer may create a new method to produce energy or food.

  Chemical engineers may specialize in a certain procedure such as polymerization or a specific field such as nanomaterials.3 Biotechnology is another option for chemical engineers. Engineers in this field use living cells to create products used in other industries such as medicine and waste reduction. Chemical engineers are responsible for the production of antibiotics, artificial organs, and hybrid plants.4

  Civil Engineers work with all of the physical components of society from bridges and tunnels to water and sewage systems. Considered one of the oldest fields of engineering, Civil Engineering requires a keen understanding of structural design and environmental properties. Like many other subcategories of engineering, Civil Engineering encompasses a number of specialties including water resources, transportation and geotechnical engineering. Civil Engineers are responsible for designing technology to help plan new communities, sports stadiums, and theme parks among many other structures.

  Computer Hardware Engineers, unlike Computer Software Engineers, design and develop the hardware, or physical components of a computer.

  Electrical Engineers work with the technology involved with electrical equipment including wiring and lighting in buildings or automobiles, power generation, and machinery controls. As opposed to Electronics Engineers, Electrical Engineers apply electrical properties to engineering power systems and manufacturing electrical equipment. They may design computer chips, fuel-efficient cars, or an entirely new product.5

  Electrical Engineers are typically hired in one of ten key industries: aerospace, bioengineering, computers, education and research, energy and electric power, industry, manufacturing, semiconductors, telecommunications, transportation and automotives. Aerospace electrical engineers develop all of the power electronics and equipment for aircrafts, spacecrafts, and helicopters.

  Such electronics may include displays, navigation, and communications equipment. Bioengineering electrical engineers apply their knowledge of electronics and electrics to medicinal engineering. For example, pacemakers and cochlear implants require the use of electrics. Computer electrical engineers work with the hardware components of computers in a quickly growing career field.

  There is high demand for advanced technology, and job opportunities are expanding. Education and research electrical engineers typically teach or conduct research after completing their PhD. Energy and electric power electrical engineers work with electrics to generate energy and machines that create energy through a variety of means including wind and fuel cells. They may also produce a product used in this field such as paper, metals, or rubber. Industry electrical engineers apply their knowledge of electrics for the benefit of other industries. For example, an industry electrical engineer may work closely with a bank and in this position assist with the electrical needs of the bank such as managing rapid-trading activities. An industry electrical engineer working for Disney may be employed to design an amusement park or assist in the creation of animated films. Manufacturing electrical engineers assist manufacturing companies in keeping their technology efficient and speedy. Semiconductors electrical engineers develop and manufacture integrated circuits to create faster and more powerful chips including digital ICs, radio-frequency integrated circuits, and mixed-signal integrated circuits. Telecommunications electrical engineers work with the electrics aspects of the telecommunications field, including work with satellite communications, microwaves, and radio networks. Transportation and automotive electrical engineers can work with any machine used in transportation. It may include working with the navigation system of a train or generating power for a ship.6

  Environmental Engineers use their knowledge of biology and chemistry to address environmental issues such as air pollution control and waste disposal.

  They may research and assess the risk of various environmental threats or design new procedures to minimize environmental damage. Environmental Engineers are primarily concerned with minimizing damage to the environment which includes protecting wildlife.

  Manufacturing Engineers have a hands-on role in the manufacturing of products. They may be in charge of monitoring an assembly line or the quality of the final product, or they may be enlisted to make sure enough of the product is created for the clients’ needs. Such positions require a broad knowledge of engineering.7

  Materials Engineers use their knowledge of the properties of materials to design, develop, and manufacture new materials that fit within a specific set of boundaries. For example, a pottery company may employ a team of Materials Engineers to create an unbreakable ceramic. Given their expert knowledge of specific materials including metals and plastics, Materials Engineers may suggest a material to be used in the production of a specific product. Typically Materials Engineers specialize in a specific material as opposed to a specific technology. Some basic materials include metals, ceramics, plastics, semiconductors, and composites.

  Semiconductors have electrical properties that are not as strong as metallic conductors, but not as weak as ceramic insulators. Composites are combinations of more than one material type. Some examples of processing techniques used in materials engineering include deposition, deformation, powder, and solidification. Deformation processing deforms a solid to create a specific shape using heat or force. Deposition processing chemically modifies a surface typically by adding a chemical vapor or ions. Power processing consolidate, pack, or particulate materials to form a “green body”.

  Solidification processing uses castings for form complex shapes out of liquid metals. While almost all industries have a need for materials engineers, three general sectors employ the majority of materials engineers: primary materials production, manufacturing, and service.8

  Mechanical Engineers design, develop, and manufacture mechanical devices such as tools and machines. These engineers study the processes involved in powering and maintaining mechanical devices including thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and design. Engineers in this discipline work with both power-producing and power-using machines. They also design tools used by engineers in other subcategories of engineering.

  The work of a Mechanical Engineer may result in the production of an internal combustion engine, an elevator, a robot, or a piece of farm equipment used in agricultural production, among an endless list of other machines. This field is especially known for its versatility and mechanical engineers find themselves qualified for work in a variety of other fields including basic engineering, energy conversion and resources, manufacturing, and materials.9

  Nanotechnology involves the design and production of miniature circuits that are primarily used to shrink the size of technological tools such as cars’ automatic door locks and cell phones. Aside from minimizing the size of technological tools for the sake of convenience, nanotechnology is also used in spy equipment.

  Robotic Engineers design and improve machines with artificial intelligence, otherwise known as robots. Robots are used to speed up manufacturing processes, to assist professionals in their jobs, and to complete jobs that are too dangerous or impossible for humans to do, such as collecting specimen samples from Mars.10

  More information on biomedical engineering, software development, and pharmaceuticals devices can be found in other profiles.



Engineering Breaking In


  Many engineers enter the career field with a bachelor’s degree, but advancement is more likely with the attainment of a professional engineers license (PE). Employers will look for specific classes on a resume, and undergraduate Hopkins engineering students have the advantage of thorough and specific academic programs which will most likely fulfill the employer’s requirements.

The guidelines for PE Licensure may differ between states, but the process typically requires the completion of four steps:

  • Attainment of a Bachelor’s Degree from an ABET-accredited engineering program (Johns Hopkins University engineering programs are ABET-accredited)
  • Passing the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam; eight-hours long, this exam is discipline-specific.
  • Completion of the Engineering In Training (EIT) period, a four-year apprenticeship that makes use of the theoretical knowledge necessary to pass the FE exam.
  • Passing the principle sand practices of engineering exam.11

  An increasing number of states are requiring that PE license holders annually complete a specific number of professional development hours (PDHs) in order to maintain their licensure. Such programs require that PE certified engineers stay informed on contemporary research and developments in their field. A PE license recognizes the holder as an accomplished engineer who has met the rigorous standards outlined in the licensing process. Most engineers in the industry have PE Certification and engineers with expertise in academia, industry, and government are increasingly suggesting that engineers become certified. The National Society of Professional Engineers equates PE Certification with medical boards and the bar exam; however, there are some engineers who practice without PE certification although the positions these engineers acquire often have strict supervision and these engineers’ chances for advancement are limited.12

  Aside from academic standards, employers want creative, analytical, and inquisitive individuals who can work well on a team. Communication skills are also important. As with many fields, experience is the best way to chance your employment prospects whether it be through an internship, co-op, or summer job. Employers are more likely to hire a student who has worked with them in one of these capacities than other applicants.13

What They Hire Undergraduates to Do:

  Entry-level engineers typically work under a supervisor who will grant them more independence as they gain experience and knowledge. In this manner, entry-level engineers advance within their field. Many entry-level engineers will work with the testing aspect of development before they can advance to design. Within any one of the subcategories there is a variety of positions a recent graduate engineering student may fill. For more information on the specific subcategories please see the links below.



Engineering Alumni


Maya Sathyanadhan - Environmental Engineering, Class of 2006 (BS), 2007 (MSE)

  1. How did you get interested in your field? Was it your original goal when you started at Hopkins? - I came into Hopkins as an undecided engineering major. I wanted to work in the aerospace field and figured that engineering would allow me to work in an industry that was indirectly connected to my true passion, astronomy (however I did not want to work as an astronomer). I decided my freshmen year that I didn’t want my interest in space to become my career but rather continue as a hobby. Thus I looked within the engineering school for a new career; I made appointments with the chairs of several departments and chose the major from the presentation I liked best, which ended up being Environmental Engineering.
  2. What was your career path? What did you do as an undergraduate and as a graduate student to get to your current job? Was this a direct route, or a circuitous one? - After I chose my major, I had several options within the field to pursue as a career (i.e. focus on energy, solid waste, or water issues). From my undergraduate classes, research, and a few internships I realized that I wanted to focus on water/sanitation issues. I also got involved with a student group (Engineers without Borders) that would help me gain more experience in this field. No matter what industry you’re in, it is very important to get involved with professional organizations while you’re still a student.
  3. What is your typical day/week like? - Typical of most entry-level engineers, I am in the office for the most part but get to do the occasional yet exciting field work. 40+ hours is almost standard.
  4. What's most rewarding about your industry and/or job? What's most challenging? - I get to work on the plants that treat water and wastewater and get satisfaction out of knowing how important, yet discrete, it is to society’s everyday life. Most people don’t realize where their water comes from or where it goes after they’ve used it, yet there is a lot of planning behind its treatment and infrastructure.
  5. What are typical entry-level positions for this field? What tips do you have for students to be successful in these positions? - A suggestion I have to any entry-level person in any field is to always aim to please your boss. As you prove your work ethic, you will get more responsibility and work on more exciting projects with time.
  6. Where do you see the field going in the next 5-10 years? - Clean water is becoming a precious resource in a lot of parts of the country, i.e., we have come to a point where we need to reuse our wastewater to meet our water demand. Internationally, water and sanitation is one of the world’s most basic problems that shouldn’t be. There is obviously lots of work to be done in this field and has exponential potential for growth.
  7. What skills and out-of-class experiences (i.e. internships, co-curricular activities, volunteering, etc.) are ideal for entering your industry / career field? - Were there specific experiences you had as an undergraduate that helped you enter the field? In the environmental field, I think internships in both the government and private companies give a good idea of how the industry works to get things done. As I mentioned earlier, I worked on campus with Engineers without Borders, which gave me tremendous technical and professional skills for my field
  8. Which professional organizations and resources should students look into or get involved with? - In my specific field, either Engineers without Borders (EWB) or Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW) are both good organizations that work on sustainable engineering. Hopkins has student chapters of both.

Evan Bauman- IT Business Systems Manager, Shell Global Solutions, Inc., Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Class of 1982

  1. How did you get interested in your field? Was it your original goal when you started at Hopkins? - Originally I was pre-med but switched to chemical engineering after I lost interest in medicine.
  2. What was your career path? What did you do as an undergraduate and as a graduate student to get to your current job? Was this a direct route, or a circuitous one? - Always intended to get a PhD and then work in corporate research. I started at the Shell Development Company right after finishing my PhD.
  3. What advice do you have for current students, especially freshmen and sophomores? - Experience, experience, experience. Get as many internships, co-ops, etc. as you can.
  4. What is your typical day like? - I'm part of a virtual team that works around the globe. My mornings are usually spent reviewing overnight emails and speaking with counterparts in Europe. Afternoons are spent on local (Houston) matters; i.e. speaking with scientists, managers.
  5. What's most rewarding about your industry and/ or job? What's most challenging? - Shell is a great company and offers many different career paths. These days, it's quite good to be in the energy business.
  6. What are typical entry-level positions for this field? What tips do you have for students to be successful in these positions? - Typical assignments for bachelors candidates are in manufacturing. It almost always requires an advanced degree to work in research or technology.
  7. Where do you see the field going in the next 5-10 years? - The energy business is very dynamic right now with opportunities in alternative energy projects as well as the traditional fields of energy discovery, transportation, and manufacturing.
  8. What skills and out-of-class experiences (i.e. internships, co-curricular activities, volunteering, etc.) are ideal for entering your industry / career field? - Be a well-rounded individual and enthusiastic about your future. Bring a unique skill that the company doesn't have already.
  9. Where can someone in an entry-level position expect to be in two years? Five years? Ten years? - This really depends on the preference of the individual. Some people in Shell stay in the same area that they started in. Some move around quite a bit; i.e. every 3-4 years.

Faisal Islam - Product Safety/Regulatory Specialist, RPM DAP Incorporated, B.S. Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Class of 1992

  1. How did you get interested in your field? Was it your original goal when you started at Hopkins? - Job requirements lead me to pursue an MHS at Hopkins in Industrial Hygiene.
  2. What was your career path? What did you do as an undergraduate and as a graduate student to get to your current job? Was this a direct route, or a circuitous one? - Career path was to complete my MHS and MBA and transition into investment banking utilizing any regulatory background and financial training which would be ideal for mergers and acquisitions for publicly traded companies in the chemical industry.
  3. What was your first job after college? Was it in your current field? - My first job out of college was QC specialist. No it was not in my current field.
  4. What advice do you have for current students, especially freshmen and sophomores? - Focus on your career path early.
  5. What is your typical day like? - Usually hectic, as we have multiple environmental regulations to comply with.
  6. What's most rewarding about your industry and/ or job? What's most challenging? - Most rewarding would be going through an audit process and not finding any internal violations. Most challenging would be keeping up with constantly changing environmental regulations.
  7. What are typical entry-level positions for this field? What tips do you have for students to be successful in these positions? - Safety specialist. Learn as much as you can about OSHA regulations and what they focus on the most like HAZCOMM.
  8. Where do you see the field going in the next 5-10 years? - It can only get larger.
  9. What skills and out-of-class experiences (i.e. internships, co-curricular activities, volunteering, etc.) are ideal for entering your industry / career field? - Try to go to different job sites and develop an understanding of their regulatory programs. Field trips are great.
  10. Which professional organizations and resources should students look into or get involved with? - ACGIH CIH
  11. What related occupations and industries would you recommend students explore who are interested in your industry or career field? - Manufacturing and operations.

Jim Beauchamp- President, Xxcelerate, Inc. Mechanical Engineer & Electrical Engineering, Class of 1966

  1. How did you get interested in your field? Was it your original goal when you started at Hopkins? - I had several friends who worked in the technical sales and application engineering fields My original goal was to pursue a position in application engineering or technical sales. I had experiences performing manufacturing and design engineering at Western Electric Co. & Ellicott Machine Co. summers, As a result I wanted to work directly with customers applying technical products to produce business solutions.
  2. What was your career path? What did you do as an undergraduate and as a graduate student to get to your current job? Was this a direct route, or a circuitous one? - Initially served as an electronic instrumentation engineer at Leeds & Northup where I was responsible for working with customers and prospects to helping them apply instrumentation products and systems. After two years, I joined IBM as a computer systems engineer. Participated in a broad education program on computer systems, software, programming and information systems design. Served Federal government scientific agencies planning and support the implementation of large scale IBM computer systems. Moved to the banking, utility and insurance team and performed as a sales representative and account manager. Joined Amdahl as a Federal Programs Director and successfully lead a campaign to expand Amdahl’s business among Federal civilian agencies. Then I took a left turn in life and moved into the information technology services industry becoming involved with external IT recruiter. This was attractive because it built on all my skills and experiences and moved me closer to having my own business. Then I moved to the New York metro area build a new business for my company in high tech engineering recruiting. This involved hiring a staff, creating an office facility, building customer relationships and connecting with lots of high tech engineers. Our team was very successful building a strong business that was cash flow positive within six months. I proved to myself that I could create a business. I returned to the Maryland area and after working for two IT contracting firms started my own business Software Consortium, Inc. We capitalized on the growing interest in PC technology and later client server and Internet technology. Our firm became the premier custom application software development firm in the Maryland. www.softwareconsortium.com. In 2007 I retired from Software Consortium.
  3. What advice do you have for current students, especially freshmen and sophomores? - A Johns Hopkins University engineering degree in any major is a wonderful foundation for many different career directions. I found that my Johns Hopkins education was very special because I “learned to learn” and it is the foundation of my life long learning philosophy and practice. Take advantage of the broad club and associate opportunities that Hopkins sponsors. Be open and flexible to any opportunity that presents itself. Aggressively pursue internships and summer jobs that may introduce you to engineering or related roles. Get familiar with the Hopkins Career Center early and utilize their resources and experts. Build your relationship skills and a personal data base of contacts at the university and within business. Leverage the Internet to research business and engineering opportunities.
  4. What is your typical day like? - This has varied though out my career. For most of my career my focus has been on serving customers and working external to my company. Adaptability, people communication, organization, discipline, focus, relationship building and continual learning have been key success factor in every position I have held. Contact me for more information.
  5. What's most rewarding about your industry and/ or job? What's most challenging? - The most rewarding aspect of my work has been my ability to control my own destiny by make choices that continual increased the flexibility and control of how I utilized my time and resources. The most challenging items have been to learn how to build long term business relationships and to learn how to work with people and organization dynamics.
  6. What are typical entry-level positions for this field? What tips do you have for students to be successful in these positions? - In large corporations the entry level role usually involves lots of training and often a rotation between departs. This is very valuable in that the more you learn in the first five years the better opportunities you will have throughout your career. In mid size and small companies you are like to be thrown right into rigorous engineering roles where you must learn on your own and produce results. This too, offers you a wonderful opportunity to learn. Your choice is dependent on your personal style and needs. I suggest that engineering graduates focus primarily on technical and interpersonal skill development for the first five years. I also encourage engineers to pursue master level education in engineering while working. For people who want to stay in engineering or engineering management a MS in engineering is most helpful. For people who want to pursue choices outside of engineering liberal arts, MBA or law degrees open new doors. Advancement and career choices will naturally broaden as an engineer develop over time. Become the best in your technical specialty is the surest way to advancement within your engineering career.
  7. Where do you see the field going in the next 5-10 years? - Over the last 12 months I have been enjoying a well deserved period of R&R after a forty year career. I have been working on a volunteer basis for the Baltimore Theatre Alliance, the JHU Engineering technology transfer initiative and other Hopkins alumni activities. I am now pursuing multiple new adventures including CEO opportunities in start up firms, a new business opportunity in the energy savings field, business consulting, and opportunities in the outplacement business. I do not know where my life will lead me but I am keeping a very open mind!
  8. What skills and out-of-class experiences (i.e. internships, co-curricular activities, volunteering, etc.) are ideal for entering your industry / career field? - Adaptability, people communication, organization, discipline, focus, relationship building and continual learning are key success factor. I suggest you seek any opportunities that build these skills a critical to your success. Internships, co-curricular activities, volunteering, etc. are all very valuable. Shortly after my Hopkins graduation I completed a MBA in marketing at American University. This program opened new windows of learning early in my career.

Katie Francis- Civil Engineering, Class Of 2006

  1. How did you get interested in your field? Was it your original goal when you started at Hopkins? - I enrolled at Hopkins interested in pursuing Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering. I switched into Civil Engineering second semester sophomore year when I realized that I did not want to spend the rest of my life working in a lab/hospital. Civil Engineering offers an opportunity to get outside and visibly see the effects of your work in the form of new structures or changes improvements to existing structures.
  2. What was your career path? How did you get to where you are today? - I have the career that I do today as a result of internship opportunities I pursued while in college and the senior design classes taken for the Civil Engineering major. Both the internships and senior design classes helped me to narrow my focus to the type of job I wanted to obtain upon graduation and also to give me the type of experience that was advantageous in making me into a desirable candidate for the position that I wanted. My internships included time in the field of construction management, at a steel fabrication plant, and at a design firm.

David Mao- Engineer, U.S. Navy Indian Head Division - Picatinny Detachment, NSWC, Biomedical Engineering, Class of 2000

  1. How did you get interested in your field? Was it your original goal when you started at Hopkins? - I randomly found my way into Federal Service. I had left grad school and didn't know what I wanted to do. A friend of the family had recently retired from the installation and suggested that I take a job there to tide me over.
  2. What was your career path? How did you get to where you are today? - For a variety of reasons, I have been moving around the installation every 2.5 years. Due to the "organizational distance" for each move, it's provided a fantastic, unintended rotational career path that has made me extremely desirable for many programs.
  3. What was your first job after college? Was it in your current field? - My first job was with the U.S. Army at this same installation. When the Navy detachment started up I switched over.
  4. What advice do you have for current students? - Try to answer those hard, career goal questions such as where do you want to be in 10 years, what sort of job environment do you want, etc. For one with a 4 year Hopkins degree, you shouldn't be defined by your degree. You need to supplement you education with the right experiences to excel and achieve your ambitions. That generally, will take some planning. However, if you are like me and can't answer those questions, I guess my path might be a way to go... maybe... I didn't plan for any of this, but I made the best of key opportunities and with the exception of "bouncing around," I have quickly become a senior engineer decades beyond my age.
  5. What is your typical day like? - A typical day for me currently involves answering/writing emails or phone calls, going to or running meetings, and training/orienting new hires.
  6. What’s most rewarding about your industry and/ or job? What's most challenging? - The few rewarding aspects of my job were additional duties due the recent war/conflicts in Southeast Asia. Since normally our role is engineering / R&D, we don't get out to the "field" that much. Because of the surge required of the military after going into Iraq and Afghanistan, I helped to inspect and repair the weapons (small arms) of units deploying overseas. The most challenging is dealing with some of the paperwork/red tape.
  7. What are typical entry-level positions for this field? What tips do you have for students to be successful in these positions? - Entry level positions can vary across the gamut. Some are lab positions so you will be working on specific lab equipment running analyses. Others are more desk positions generally doing some sort of design work.
  8. Where do you see the field going in the next 5-10 years? - With the current administration, many additional Government positions are being created or being converted from Contractors. However, it’s unclear how much the military budget will be cut.
  9. What skills and out-of-class experiences are ideal for entering your industry / career field? - Personally for me, hands-on leadership experiences were key to developing my confidence and ability to handle situations and solve issues/problems without somebody to hold my hand (for better or worse). For example, I ran the Intramural Sports program (before there was a staff person doing it) and led the ASCE Steel Bridge team for 2 years. Being able and responsible to execute something without having somebody to fall back on is key to gaining greater responsibility at work. Otherwise, any sort of "field" or practical experience is a must. Hopkins provides an extremely strong theoretical education --- as it should. In my experience, my undergraduate degree exceeds that of most local master's degrees. With that sort of foundation, you need to (or I needed to anyway) round yourself out with the practical side of engineering. My summer internship with Whiting Turner was extremely beneficial as I was able to see, experience, and help out (engineering, not physical labor) with putting an $11M building up.
  10. Where can someone in an entry-level position expect to be in two years? Five years? Ten years? - At my location, the mass exodus of retirement eligible personnel is just about over. The first/recent Government hires starting from 1999 have already begun taking the first line supervisor positions. In 2 years you should just about reach a journeyman stage where you can do something on your own with somebody providing oversight. In 5 years, you should be able to handle your own set of tasks if not have your own project to run.

Additional Alumni Profiles

    Networking with alumni and other professionals who work in these fields can help you learn very specific information about a career field. Use Johns Hopkins Connect to contact alumni to ask for their advice. You may also find professional contacts through professional associations, faculty, friends and family.

    If you would like to talk about how your search is going, we invite you to make an appointment with a Career Counselor by calling 410-516-8056.

LinkedIn.com - a professional networking site where you can identify Hopkins alumni. Join the LinkedIn Johns Hopkins University Alumni Group to add over 4000+ alumni to your network.



Engineering Resources


Resources:

Industry /Professional Organizations:

Industry Websites:

  • Graduating Student Engineer
  • Networking:

      Networking with professionals who work in this field can help you learn very specific information about a career field. Professional contacts through professional associations, faculty, friends and family can be very helpful. You may also explore career opportunities by talking with employers at career fairs, and company presentations.

      Internships - research positions and summer employment are highly effective ways for you to try out a field, gain experience and skills and make professional contacts.



    Engineering Related


      If you would like to talk about how your search is going, we invite you to make an appointment with a Career Counselor by calling 410-516-8056.

    Footnotes

      Engineering Footnotes